October 10, 2018

Dear friends,
Despite ambitious plans, I ended up cooking just one or two things during a recent vacation in France. My favorite was a first-course soup made with fat, sweet carrots and leeks we bought at the weekly market in nearby Olonzac.

The soup I tossed together started with a handful of lardons (batons of pork belly, essentially) my friend had in the fridge. I sautéed the chopped leeks and a clove of garlic in the renderings, then reduced some wine to add another layer of flavor. Then in went the carrots, fresh herbs Linda grows in her elevated courtyard, and some of her homemade chicken broth. When I asked for cream to finish the soup after pureeing, Linda hauled out a pot of creme fraiche. A couple of dollops is all it took.

With such exceptional ingredients, the soup was bound to be good. And it was — creamy, complex and a touch sweet from the carrots, with notes of herbs. We served it at room temperature in stemmed martini glasses. Ooh la la.

When I returned home I made the soup again to measure the ingredients and construct a recipe. Even without lardons, French carrots, homemade stock and creme fraiche, the soup is pretty good. Actually, more than pretty good.

Make this with the new crop of freshly dug carrots, and serve it warm on a crisp fall day.

CARROT-LEEK SOUP WITH THYME

2 slices bacon, chopped
2 leeks, white part only
1 fat clove garlic, chopped
Sprig of thyme
1 bay leaf
1 tsp. salt
1/2 cup dry white wine
5 medium carrots, cleaned and sliced
1 quart chicken broth
1/2 cup cream

Render bacon in a 4-quart saucepan. Remove bacon with a slotted spoon and set aside to drain. Slice white part of leeks in half lengthwise and clean well under running cold water. Drain. Roughly chop. Sauté in bacon fat with garlic over medium-high heat until leeks are wilted, adding olive oil if needed.

Stir in thyme, bay leaf and salt. Add white wine and boil until reduced by half. Stir in carrots. Add chicken broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer, uncovered for 35 to 40 minutes or until vegetables are very soft.

Remove thyme stem and bay leaf from soup. Puree until smooth with a stick blender or in batches in a food processor, returning to pan. Stir in cream and heat through. Ladle into cups or bowls. Makes 6 cups soup. Soup may be served hot, cold or at room temperature.

TIDBIT
If you have room on your shelf for more cookbooks and you live in or near Akron, you won’t want to miss the Akron Summit County Public LIbrary’s Big Book Sale this coming Friday, Oct. 12.

James Switzer of Friends of the Main Library reports that although the thousands of used books for sale range broadly in subject matter, “…there will be at least a couple hundred cookbooks, some classic, some specialized (nationality or regional, courses like soups or desserts, techniques like bread machines, Crock Pots or pressure cookers, health books on diets and heart-healthy).”

The books will go for $1 for most hardbacks, 50 cents for paperbacks and 25 cents for series romances. The sale will spill over into the lobby from the gift shop, and will be held during regular library hours. Switzer notes that parking is free on Saturday in the deck adjoining the library on High Street.

GUT CHECK
What I cooked last week:
Sautéed chicken tenders with herbs de Provence over mesclun salad with toasted walnuts and dried cranberries; carrot and leek soup, pan-grilled strip steak, green salad with cucumbers.

What I ate out last week:
Lentil salad, mustard chicken, mashed potatoes, wedge of Camembert, pineapple cake on Air France; Szechuan wontons in chile oil and a platter of hot and spicy Hunan blue crabs in a sticky sauce at Cheng Du Spicy Food in Flushing, N.Y.; pepperoni pizza from Rizzi’s in Copley; superfoods salad and spicy beef kefta roll at Aladdin’s in Montrose; Macedonian bean soup and half an egg salad sandwich at Village Gardens in Cuyahoga Falls; ham salad on whole wheat at Honey Baked Ham in Montrose.

THE MAILBAG
From Janet C.:
Regarding the items you saw in French supermarkets: When I was with my niece in France last year to visit her daughter, an exchange student, we were fed mightily at each of her host’s homes. One of the families served a meal made of different kinds of crepes. The lady was able to purchase the crepes at the store, with a sheet of paper like between deli meats between each one.

The main course was huge crepes cooked in a skillet in butter, topped with ham and cheese, and while the cheese melted, a fried egg with a runny yolk was done in a separate skillet and placed in the center, then folded like a packet for each person.

The dessert crepes were smaller and cooked again in lots of butter with either just sugar, hazelnut spread or jam in them. The meal was accompanied by an oil and vinegar-dressed salad and copious amounts of wine. I do not know of anywhere you can simply pick up fresh crepes.

Dear Janet:
Great idea for easy entertaining as long as you don’t have to make the crepes, right? I remember years ago Frieda’s Finest marketed crepes that were sold in the produce sections of some stores. I haven’t seen them lately.

From James S.:
I never tasted West Point’s double (triple) ginger cookies, but Trader Joe’s has triple ginger snaps. Not to die for, but the best I ever ate.

Dear James:
I think it’s a about time we got a Trader Joe’s in Akron.

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